The Therapist Planner

The Therapist Planner

The Therapist Planner by Marline Francois

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Summary:

The Therapist Planner is a planner designed by a therapist for therapists with our unique needs in mind.

About the author:

Marline Francois Madden is a LCSW with a private practice in New Jersey. She works as a counselor, coach, and a public speaker who focuses on mental health issues. You can learn more about her here.

What we love:

The Therapist Planner has a clean layout that works well for keeping track of appointments and includes space for each day’s to-do list. It’s an attractive planner and is spiral bound with a hard cover so I think it will stand up to a year of work.

The planner has quick reference guides that many therapists will find helpful. There is a list of commonly used ICD-10 codes as well as a chart with common psychotropic medications that includes their generic name and typical dosage. Having those at your fingertips is a nice bonus.

What we didn’t:

At the beginning of the Therapist Planner is an illustration of the eight life categories they suggest you make goals in. However, there are no goal worksheets or any places for goal setting and tracking throughout the calendar. There is a space for each month to write your “why” and a business affirmation but I think it would have benefited from space for goals.

Clinical Use:

The Therapist Planner is perfect for clinicians who want to keep a paper office and for those who aren’t ready to invest in expensive software. You have spaces to track much of the information that you need to grow your business.

Buy It Here

If you know of another planner or a book we need to review, let us know here or tell us about it in the comments. Make sure you’re also following The Therapist’s Bookshelf on Facebook and Instagram.

Many therapists enjoy recommending books to their clients to supplement the work they are doing together. We also use books to help ourselves grow as people and practitioners. Remember though that books are never a replacement for real human connection or for therapy when it’s needed. If you find yourself needing a therapist, a great place to start is Psychology Today. If you are having thoughts of hurting yourself or someone else, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Hotline.

My new venture is an online private practice serving couples and individuals in Texas. I specialize in parents of kids with special needs and adoptive parents. If you someone who might benefit from my services, I would appreciate the referral. They can find me at 1000HillsCounseling.com.

Le Shepard

Le Shepard earned her MA in Counseling Psychology from Texas Woman's University in Denton, TX. She currently works as an adjunct psychology professor at Weatherford College Wise County and counsels adults and couples at Wise County Christian Counseling.

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