Family Therapy

Family therapy can be effective when treating many different types of client issues.  Therapists who practice family therapy recommended these resources.

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Counseling Families: Play-Based Treatment edited by Eric J. Green,‎ Jennifer Baggerly,‎ and Amie C. Myrick

Counseling Families presents a practical integration of expressive arts and play therapy within family counseling from a humanistic perspective. When working with families with young children, play psychotherapy is often used by clinicians with an individual child, but not necessarily integrated within the familial context. This volume presents an integrative model of family play counseling that incorporates tenets of filial therapy, family play therapy, expressive arts, and play interventions when working with children and their families. The authors also include chapters on supervision of therapists providing family play counseling, as well as critical steps toward self-care to prevent burn out.



family therapy

Assessment and Treatment Activities for Children, Adolescents, and Families: Practitioners Share Their Most Effective Techniques by Liana Lowenstein

In this comprehensive resource, highly acclaimed author Liana Lowenstein has compiled an impressive collection of techniques from experienced practitioners. Interventions are outlined for engaging, assessing, and treating children of all ages and their families. Activities address a range of issues including, Feelings Expression, Social Skills, Self-Esteem, and Termination. A must have for mental health professionals seeking to add creative interventions to their repertoire.




family therapy

The Quick-Reference Guide to Marriage & Family Counseling by Dr. Tim Clinton and Dr. John Trent

We all know of families or marriages in crisis. When those suffering in such situations turn to us for help, where do we turn? The Quick-Reference Guide to Marriage and Family Counseling provides the answers. It is an A-Z guide for assisting people-helpers–pastors, professional counselors, youth workers, and everyday believers–to easily access a full array of information to aid them in (formal and informal) counseling situations. Issues addressed by Clinton and Trent include affairs and adultery, communication in marriage, parenting, sibling rivalry, and many more. Each of the forty topics covered follows a helpful eight-part outline and identifies: 1) typical symptoms and patterns, 2) definitions and key thoughts, 3) questions to ask, 4) directions for the conversation, 5) action steps, 6) biblical insights, 7) prayer starters, and 8) recommended resources.


If you know of another book that belongs on this list let us know here or tell us about it in the comments. Make sure you’re also following The Therapist’s Bookshelf on Facebook and Instagram.

Many therapists enjoy recommending books to their clients to supplement the work they are doing together. We also use books to help ourselves grow as people and practitioners. Remember though that books are never a replacement for real human connection, for supervision and continuing education, or for therapy when it’s needed. If you find yourself needing a therapist, a great place to start is Psychology Today. If you are having thoughts of hurting yourself or someone else, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Hotline.


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